Tag Archive: Hungry


This is yesterday’s sermon from Community Lutheran Church!

I want to begin by asking you to close your eyes. Imagine before you a beautiful home, expansive and furnished impeccably. As you walk down the hall, you round a corner and see a huge banquet hall. The aroma of rich food and spiced wine reaches you before you see the table groaning under the weight of roasted meats, freshly baked bread, an array of cheeses, and brightly colored vegetables and fruits. Even the dishes themselves are exquisite. You’ve never seen a finer feast and you pinch yourself, trying to see if you are dreaming.

The Feast from Harry Potter... cause who doesn't love Harry Potter?! (From: http://i.imgur.com/VxChzNz.jpg)

The Feast from Harry Potter… cause who doesn’t love Harry Potter?! (From: http://i.imgur.com/VxChzNz.jpg)

Open your eyes. Hungry? This is the feast of Lady Wisdom described in Proverbs. She decorates her home like some sort of Martha Stewart guru and has her servant girls run around the city – even to the very top, inviting everyone to come in. But she doesn’t pass out invitations or even issue a formal decree. No, she calls out to everyone who will listen, “You that are simple, turn in here!” Well that’s one way to invite people! Perhaps she’s not so great with social etiquette after all. You see, if I were going to have a feast, the last thing that I would want to do is run around saying “Hey! Simple, senseless folks, come on over for supper!” I mean, for one, it’s insulting, and two, who knows who might show up?!

So what’s going on here? The book of Proverbs was a book historically designed to help instruct young people in the way to live their lives wisely. Wisdom is personified as a woman who sets a decadent feast, calling those who are in need of guidance and instruction to eat at her table. Here, eating is a metaphor for learning the way of God, being satisfied by God’s teaching and transformed by the meal. Lady Wisdom’s arch nemesis is Lady Folly – personified as a loud, lazy woman who calls out from her doorway, enticing the simple with promises of food and drink that sound appealing, but lead only to peoples’ demise.

Both call out to the simple, calling them to come and dine. The difference is that Lady Wisdom offers true food and drink – instruction in the ways of God that lead to life. Lady Folly offers food and drink that look good, but lead to death.

Given these two options, it seems only natural that one would want to feast with Lady Wisdom. But doing so requires admitting that we’re not as wise as we might have thought. It means humbly admitting that we need help and instruction in order to learn and grow, which can be more difficult than it sounds. As one member of the Wednesday Bible study put it, “we’re stupid and we don’t admit we’re simple.” It also means turning down what might seem appealing in the short term in order to embrace what is truly life-giving. And that can be a challenge.

I like the way David Brazzeal puts it in his book, Pray like a Gourmet: “Does your prayer life feel like you’re eating the same food over and over every day – mixing the same ingredients but hoping for a new, more enticing dish?

Or perhaps you’re experiencing something more like a divine drive-thru. You hurriedly place “your order,” always in a rush, expecting God to deliver it promptly at the next window?

Maybe your most intimate moments with God are akin to grabbing a cheap frozen dinner from the stack in the freezer and tossing it in the microwave: bland, monotonous, and predictably uninteresting.

I understand. I’ve been there too. We all deal with twenty-first century pressures, stresses, distractions, and time constraints. We fall prey to the default mode of our culture- fast and efficient. We’ve even allowed what George Ritzer calls the ‘McDonaldization’ of our society to invade and take root within the very relationship that is most precious to us – the one that, in fact, is the source that sustains and nurtures our soul. No wonder we feel spiritually anemic and malnourished.”

Sometimes we settle for the fast food of Lady Folly and the world rather than attending the gourmet meal of Lady Wisdom and God. I think it’s one of the reasons we’ve been spending so much time talking about Jesus as the Bread of Life. Food is essential to our survival and we don’t usually need to be reminded to eat, but we do need to be reminded of who Jesus is – the One who sustains and gives life – and about how important it is to be nourished in our faith.

In the Gospel for this morning, Jesus pushes the idea of being the Bread of Life even further – to a point where it sounds like, well, cannibalism. “Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them.” Yikes. Of course, we hear this and we think of the Last Supper, the cross and resurrection, but it must have been shocking to hear. But here’s what I think he’s getting at.

Jesus gives us himself – completely. He gives us his body and his blood on the cross. He gives everything he has for our sake. And he gives us something to chew on. We’ve looked at Lady Wisdom’s feast versus Lady Folly’s and one of the differences is that Lady Folly’s food is an easy meal. It sounds good, but it doesn’t taste great and it leads to destruction. The feast that Lady Wisdom sets and the feast that Jesus offers is not an easy meal.

Jesus says those who eat of his flesh will have eternal life. And the word that he uses for “eat” really means “to gnaw” – yep, it means “to chew.” Christ gives us something to chew on – something to think about. He doesn’t give us something easy to swallow or easy to digest. He gives us something that causes us to wrestle, to wonder, to engage with for the rest of our life. We can’t just down it in one single solitary gulp and be satisfied. It’s something that we are constantly required to chew on, to savor, and to think about.

We’re invited to return to the table again and again to try and figure out what God means for our lives. What faith means for our lives as individuals, what it means for our life as a people in community, and what it means when we walk out of that door and engage with people from different backgrounds and different places. What it means when we go to work or when we serve in our various roles. We are forced to gnaw on our faith and to figure out what it means to live it out. Like a dog chewing on a bone, we are to be engaged with our faith and in our relationship with God.

I love the metaphor of attending the feast, because I love food, but also because it’s an active metaphor. God invites us to the feast and we come to partake of the rich food – to learn and practice our faith, but also to share around the table. Since we’re Lutheran, maybe it’s helpful to think of it as a potluck. God provides the main dish and an abundance of strong coffee, and we all bring a dish, maybe it’s a Jell-O casserole, representing our gifts, skills and experiences to share with others. Together, in community, we worship, learn and grow, and we wrestle with our faith, our questions and our doubts.

We are lavishly saved by God’s amazing grace through Christ’s cross and resurrection, but that doesn’t mean that life will be easy or the way clear-cut. We will always need help, instruction and support in God’s ways – in trying to live as followers of Christ in the world. That’s why we come back to this place week after week to hear God’s word and be forgiven and strengthened at the table. Because we will always be distracted by the loud shouting of Folly that would cause us to turn from God, to live in fear, to belittle ourselves or others, or to seek fame and glory instead of the way of the cross and a life of discipleship.

God wants life for us – abundant life – and not just in eternity, but here and now. God wants to feast with us and to be active in and with us. Christ is inviting us to eat and drink more deeply so we might discover that the food of the world we’ve been settling for – power, riches, acclaim, success, popularity – it might look good, but really ends up leaving a bad taste in our mouths. Just as Christ gave his flesh and blood – everything he had for us – we’re invited to give our whole selves to following him. Bland prayer life? Come on out to Diving into Prayer and try something new. Feeling like you want a refresher in the basics of faith? Sign up to help teach Sunday School – it’s a blast and it’ll help you learn as well. Looking for a way to serve, but unsure of how to do so? Come out on Rally Day to learn more about our ministries here. Christ is inviting us to swap the metaphorical frozen pizzas we’ve been living off of, for the richness of a gourmet meal.

“You that are simple, turn in here!” We don’t like being called simple, but if it reminds us to turn to God instead of relying on ourselves, it’s a good thing. If it points to the good news that God wants us to lay aside our own agendas and ways we’re missing out on God’s abundance by settling for Folly and cheap substitutes, it’s a good thing. My prayer for all of us then is that the Holy Spirit might humble us and open our hearts so that we can see and taste the splendor of the magnificent feast God lays before us each and every day. Amen.

© 2015. Annabelle Peake Markey. All rights reserved.

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“Get up and eat!”

This is the sermon I preached this morning at Christ Lutheran Church in Washington, DC.

The Texts:
1 Kings 19:4-8

4But he himself went a day’s journey into the wilderness, and came and sat down under a solitary broom tree. He asked that he might die: “It is enough; now, O LORD, take away my life, for I am no better than my ancestors.” 5Then he lay down under the broom tree and fell asleep. Suddenly an angel touched him and said to him, “Get up and eat.” 6He looked, and there at his head was a cake baked on hot stones, and a jar of water. He ate and drank, and lay down again. 7The angel of the LORD came a second time, touched him, and said, “Get up and eat, otherwise the journey will be too much for you.” 8He got up, and ate and drank; then he went in the strength of that food forty days and forty nights to Horeb the mount of God.

John 6:35, 41-51
35Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty. 41Then the Jews began to complain about him because he said, “I am the bread that came down from heaven.” 42They were saying, “Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How can he now say, ‘I have come down from heaven’?” 43Jesus answered them, “Do not complain among yourselves. 44No one can come to me unless drawn by the Father who sent me; and I will raise that person up on the last day. 45It is written in the prophets, ‘And they shall all be taught by God.’ Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to me. 46Not that anyone has seen the Father except the one who is from God; he has seen the Father. 47Very truly, I tell you, whoever believes has eternal life. 48I am the bread of life. 49Your ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died. 50This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. 51I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.”

Elijah is having a really rough time.  He’s just had this epic face-off with 450 prophets of the god Baal.  He alone stood up for and served the LORD, while everyone else was worshiping Baal.  In his face-off with the prophets of Baal, they had dueling sacrifices to see who was the real God – Baal or the God of Abraham, Isaac and Israel.  The God of Israel shows God’s power and the hearts of the people return to God once more.  Then, in a difficult to swallow maneuver, Elijah rounds up the prophets of Baal and kills them by the sword according to the law in Deuteronomy saying that false prophets should be killed.  That should be the end of the story, right?  Well, it’s not.  Jezebel, the king’s wife, is none too pleased with this and threatens to kill Elijah just like he killed the prophets of Baal.  It’s not looking good for our hero!  This is where we find ourselves with today’s reading from 1 Kings.

Fearing for his life, Elijah journeys out into the wilderness, just out of Jezebel’s reach, plops down under a solitary shrub, and laments his situation.  “It is enough; now, O LORD, take away my life, for I am no better than my ancestors.”  Elijah is burnt out.  He’s overwhelmed by everything that’s occurred in his life.  He’s wondering if he can take any more of this prophetic calling.  He just wants to throw in the towel.  He wants it to be over.

Well, as the saying goes, “things always look better in the morning,” so Elijah lays down under the tree in exhaustion and falls asleep.  While he’s sleeping, an angel appears and touches him, telling him to “get up and eat.”  Now, initially, I thought this seemed like an odd response to someone who is feeling utterly wiped out.  However, this spring I learned a word that might help us to understand a bit of what Elijah was feeling.  The word is “hangry.”  Hangry is when you are angry because you’re hungry.  It’s when you start to get a bit cranky and snippy and on edge because you haven’t eaten in a while.  It’s when the world starts to get a bit overwhelming because you haven’t been fed recently.  Has anyone experienced this?  So maybe being a bit hungry contributed to Elijah’s feelings of being severely overwhelmed.

In any case, Elijah was definitely dealing with some big problems.  Interestingly enough, it seems that God’s recipe for turning things around is taking care of the prophet’s basic needs first: a nap and a snack.  So Elijah eats the bread-cake and drinks the water the angel provides, then he falls back asleep.  But then the angel wakes him again, this time saying, “get up and eat, otherwise the journey will be too much for you.”  Now, if I were Elijah, I would appreciate this heavenly snack, but I’d probably be thinking “ummmm, journey, what journey?!  I just want to curl up in a ball and sleep, ok?”

But there must have been something about that food that gave Elijah the energy to continue on with his calling.  Something that renewed his strength, turned his attitude around, and gave him hope.

In 1954, as Europe was continuing to rebuild after World War II, J.R.R. Tolkien published the first volume of what would become his most famous work: The Lord of the Rings.  In the three volumes of this fantasy book, the seemingly weak and insignificant forces of good battle the utterly overwhelming forces of evil.  Part of this battle includes taking the one ring into the heart of where evil resides in order to destroy it once and for all.  Those who will carry this burden are the most unlikely of all – simple creatures called hobbits who love good food and drink, pleasant company and the outdoors.  Taking the ring to be destroyed seems like an impossible task, but they are helped along their journey by others and by the gifts that their companions give them.

One gift is the gift of lembas bread or waybread made by elves.  In the book, Tolkien describes this bread as “very thin cakes, made of a meal that was baked a light brown on the outside, and inside was the colour of cream.”  When they run out of everything else, it is this simple bread that sustains the hobbits, Frodo and Sam, on their dangerous, lonely and nearly insurmountable journey.  As the author describes it later in the book: “The lembas had a virtue without which they would long ago have lain down to die.  It did not satisfy desire, and at times Sam’s mind was filled with the memories of food, and the longing for simple bread and meats.  And yet this waybread of the Elves had a potency that increased as travellers relied on it alone and did not mingle it with other foods.  It fed the will, and it gave strength to endure, and to master sinew and limb beyond the measure of mortal kind.”

Just like Elijah, the hobbits would have lain down to die without this food.  But just like Elijah, they were fed with bread that was far more than it looked to be at first sight.   The fact that this bread made by elves sounds like Communion is no accident.  J.R.R. Tolkien, the author of this wonderful book, was a devout Catholic, weaving Christian elements and symbolism into his fantasy story.  And as the book The Gospel According to Tolkien: Visions of the Kingdom in Middle-earth explains, “…the elven-food called lembas [is]clearly reminiscent of the Eucharistic wafer: its airy lightness gives strength in direct disproportion to its weight.”

“Get up and eat, otherwise the journey will be too much for you.”  Life is hard.  Life is journey full of twists, turns, bumps in the road, mountains and valleys, surprises, joys, sorrows, laughter, tears, pains and comforts.  That’s a lot to handle.  And sometimes, we feel like Elijah, like we’re the only ones on the perilous journey.  We have those days where we’re wiped out and we just want to find our own solitary broom tree that we can curl up underneath.  Some days, we just want to pull the covers up over our heads.

And God gets that.  Rather than telling Elijah he has to carry on or that he’s failing at being a prophet since he’s overwhelmed, God lets Elijah rest.  Then the angel of God wakes him and gives him food that sustains him for forty days and forty nights.  This food he is given is enough to get him to Mount Horeb, the mountain of God.  The simple bread and water is enough to sustain him on the journey until he reaches the place where he will once again encounter God.

And just as God fed and sustained Elijah for his journey and calling, God feeds and sustains us so that the journey of life will not be too much for us.  As we hear from Jesus in the Gospel, “”I am the bread of life.  Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.”  Jesus feeds us with himself, being fully present in the bread and wine we have every week.  Jesus presents himself to us, promising to be with us on our journeys through this meal – through plain food and drink shared with the promises of God.

Communion Bread and Wine

Holy Communion became really important to me while I was studying abroad in Germany – while I was on a journey of my own.  While there, a large part of my diet consisted of bread and cheese, both of which Europeans do fabulously!  However, it wasn’t this bread alone that kept me going.  It was the bread I received at a tiny Lutheran church on Sunday mornings.  Coming up to the altar rail, receiving that bread in my folded hands, and hearing “the body of Christ given for you” was so incredibly powerful.  You see, I had only received Communion like that once before, so to hear those words and to know that this was a meal and promise given for me – and for everyone – was incredible.

When I returned home after living in Germany, I did not attend church because I had previously had a painful experience with a church here in the States.  But as time went on and work became more frustrating and overwhelming, I realized how much I missed Holy Communion.  I realized just how much I needed that little piece of bread and that sip of wine.  I needed the promise of God and the mysterious food that would sustain me in my everyday life.  I wanted and needed to be fed by simple bread and wine.  I wanted and needed to be fed by the promises and the word of God.  I wanted and needed to be fed and nourished in my faith.  I wanted and needed that bread of life that nourishes us to have abundant life with Christ in the here and now.

So I found a church, risking another bad experience in order that I might hear the promise: “the body of Christ given for you” and “the blood of Christ shed for you.”  I went back so that I might be fed.  And I was.

And like Elijah, I was fed so that I might continue on my journey – a journey that has led me here, to this place, to share in Holy Communion with all of you.

“Get up and eat, otherwise the journey will be too much for you.”  God feeds us.  God gives us what we need to sustain us on our journeys through life.  God gives us food for our souls so that we can, like Elijah, carry out what God is calling us to do in life.  When we are in that place of feeling overwhelmed, of being stressed out, of feeling worn out to the point of giving up, God welcomes us to the table.  God tells us to eat so that we are satisfied.  We are welcomed over and over again to the feast so that we can “taste and see that the LORD is good!”  Thanks be to God!  Amen.

© 2012. Annabelle Peake Markey. All rights reserved.

This is the sermon I preached this morning at Trinity Lutheran Church in North Bethesda, Maryland for the Feast of Mary, Mother of Our Lord.

Luke 1:46–55
And Mary said,
“My soul magnifies the Lord,
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant.
Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
for the Mighty One has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.
His mercy is for those who fear him
from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts.
He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
and sent the rich away empty.
He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
according to the promise he made to our ancestors,
to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

In order to get to the seminary in Gettysburg, I drive up Rt. 15, a pretty drive through farmland and over the Catoctin Mountains. About 40 minutes into my drive, I usually reach Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland just before crossing over the border into Pennsylvania. For those of you who haven’t been out that way, behind the University on a hill and reaching over the trees on an 80-foot tall bell tower is a gleaming gold statue of the Virgin Mary with her arms in a welcoming gesture. Each morning, I can’t help but look up at this statue to see how the sun is hitting it or how the morning fog is drifting around the mountains. Looking at this gorgeous golden statue, it’s almost hard to imagine Mary’s earthly life.

Mary’s own words in the Magnificat, our Gospel reading for today, sum up her life best: she sings that God looked on the “lowliness of his servant.” Mary was a poor, young Jewish girl, recently engaged to Joseph when she received the unexpected and life-changing news that she was to bear a son. This was not just any son either, but, as the angel Gabriel explained, a holy child, a child who would be known as the “Son of the Most High” and the “Son of God,” whose kingdom would have no end. Mary bears the son who shows us that God is indeed with us.

In her song, Mary sings exuberantly about the great deeds of God – actions affecting both the world and her own personal life. In fact, it is due to God’s work in her life that she declares that all generations will call her blessed. This is very odd considering that God’s work in her life almost certainly would have caused people to whisper about and look down on this pregnant, unmarried girl. Yet, even with these thoughts, Mary recognized that what God was doing in her was important and that she was chosen for a great task, and she joyfully responded to God’s call, trusting Gabriel’s message that “nothing will be impossible with God.”

Instead of choosing the rich or powerful, the ones society esteems, God calls and raises up the ordinary. Again and again, God’s stunning and gracious theme of lifting up the lowly is repeated in Scripture. Joseph, once a slave and prisoner in Egypt, is given tremendous power in the Pharaoh’s court. The shepherd boy David crushes the mighty Goliath and becomes a king who will be honored throughout time. God selects a poor, young woman from Nazareth to bring about the incarnation. And it is in the shame and humiliation of the cross that God’s incredible love for all of humanity, each and every one of us, is made visible.

As Mary sings, “He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty.” In the Magnificat, Mary sings about the God who cares for the poor and hungry, once more giving them a name and a place in society. In the early church, Mary was given the name “Theotokos” a word which literally means “God-bearer.” While Mary’s specific calling was to physically bear God to the world, amazingly enough, God has also called us to be God-bearers – those who share the love of God with the world.

Our lives bear witness to the God who has been at work in them. Think about it – the word “Christian” indicates that we are to share Christ with one another and with the world. This title we carry is a sign, pointing to the one we follow. Like a sort of holy graffiti spelling out “God is here,” our lives should proclaim the work of the living and active God. But how do we bear the love of Christ to others?

This task may seem too big for us. I know some days it certainly feels that way to me! We say, “I can’t do what God is calling me to do. I’m not good enough” or “I don’t have the skills needed” or “I’m too afraid” or “what will I say?” But Mary, a young girl, uneducated and of low-ranking status in society, shows us that God doesn’t necessarily call those we would choose. Instead, God calls each one of us to be a part of the extraordinary work God is doing – to be a part of the kingdom of God, already here and still not quite fully realized.

Sadly, instead of following Mary’s example, we often construct barriers and walls to keep God out, when all God asks is that we become open to hearing how God is calling us. As Martin Luther pointed out when discussing the three miracles of Christmas, “the virgin birth is a mere trifle for God; that God should become man is a greater miracle; but most amazing of all is that this maiden should credit the announcement that she, rather than some other virgin, had been chosen to be mother of God. She held fast to the word of the angel because she had become a new creature. Even so must we be transformed and renewed in heart from day-to-day. Otherwise, Christ is born in vain.”

Just like Mary, the mother of our Lord, God asks us to be receptive to the work God longs to do in us and through us. Moreover, we must actually believe that God can and will do what God promises. Otherwise, as Luther argued, what is the point of Jesus coming into the world if we are not transformed by his love or refuse to heed his call or to share his love with those around us? In those moments when we believe and hold fast to the promises of God and allow God to work through us, we become God-bearers to those around us, even if we can’t always see the fruits of our labor.

This summer, I was a chaplain during my Clinical Pastoral Education internship. When I first began, I had this nervous feeling that people would be asking difficult theological questions of me – maybe even questions I wasn’t prepared to answer. Talk about intimidated! However, after a few weeks of visits, I realized, much to my surprise, that, more than anything, people wanted someone to listen, someone to whom they could explain their sorrows, fears, hope and dreams. Yes, above all, people wanted a compassionate ear, someone who would patiently and empathetically listen.

I found that as a chaplain, I was called to share the love of Christ with others by being with them in their struggles and loneliness. I came to realize that it wasn’t always in the words we say, but in how we open ourselves to receive others’ stories and to be with others that we bear God to those around us.

There is incredible good news in the lessons I learned this summer, as well as in the shining example Mary gives us. Both remind us that all are capable of bearing God to the world. It definitely doesn’t take a seminarian or a chaplain to listen or to be with others in their difficulties. Remember, Mary didn’t have any seminary training in order to be a God-bearer! Instead, Mary’s story and her song ask us to remember that each and every one of us, no matter how ordinary we think we are, has been called to show the love, mercy and compassion of God to others.

Within the church, people can respond to God’s call by being Stephen Ministers – people trained to be empathetic listeners – or by participating in other ministries. But it’s crucial to remember that God’s love is not confined inside the walls of the church. This spring, I was strengthened and encouraged in my faith by a Muslim woman. This young woman spoke of the difficulties one sometimes faces as a person of faith, but that these hardships only made her feel closer to God. This conversation reminded me that God is with us in all of our sufferings and trials and gave me energy to finish out the spring semester.

And, more recently, a friend of mine witnessed to the love of God by helping his neighbors. After hearing that they were grieving and going through a difficult time, he listened to their story, helped them bring groceries inside and offered his help if they needed it in the future. As Henri Nouwen, a Catholic priest and prolific spiritual writer explained, “we are called to witness, always with our lives and sometimes with our words, to the great things God has done for us.” Sometimes simple gestures of patience, compassion and kindness are all people need to break through the darkness and remind them that there are people who care and a God who loves them.

There is a song by Brandon Heath entitled “Give Me Your Eyes” which has become a moving prayer for me. The lyrics are as follows:

“Give me your eyes for just one second,
Give me your eyes so I can see,
Everything that I keep missing,
Give me your love for humanity.
Give me your arms for the broken-hearted,
The ones that are far beyond my reach,
Give me you heart for the ones forgotten,
Give me your eyes so I can see…”

If we, like Mary, are open to listening to God and to what God is calling us to, we will indeed be given everything we need to reach out to others. Just as God kept the promises made to Abraham and the promise that a Savior would be born, God will be faithful and grant us what we need to reach out in love, mercy and service to others.

And, if we keep our eyes and, most importantly, our hearts open, we will find that there are plenty of people who could use a listening ear, a kind word or a shoulder to cry on. Moreover, we, like Mary in her song, can share the joy we have in knowing God and the freedom of forgiveness with a world weary and weighed down with violence, bad news and hurt. There are so many hungry people waiting to be filled with good things, whether that means food, a safe place to stay or hope for the future. How can we share God with them so that they also might be filled with good things?

Both CPE and Mary’s story have taught me that there is a beautiful ebb and flow to all of this. Mary is open to God’s frightening call to bring a Savior into the world, even though it might have meant ridicule and persecution for her. The disciples were open to Jesus’ call to follow and were empowered to spread the news of the kingdom of God. Jesus was open to life as one of us – open to suffering and death on a cruel cross in order to bring light, forgiveness and new life to every corner of the world. What if any of them hadn’t been open to God’s call or had said “no?”

This ebb and flow is crucial in our lives as followers of Christ. Daily, we remember our baptisms in which we have died with Christ and been raised to new life in him. Week after week we gather around the Lord’s Table to receive God and be nourished so that we can be sent back into the world to witness to God’s work in our lives. We must listen to others in order to know what they are going through in their lives so we can help bear their burdens. And, we ourselves, must be able to receive assistance from friends, neighbors and even strangers, so that, once again, we may be ready to tackle the tasks we have been given.

As Albert Schweitzer, a theologian, renowned organist and philanthropist of the 20th century encouraged, “Impart as much as you can of your spiritual being to those who are on the road with you, and accept as something precious what comes back to you from them.” We must learn to give and receive in our walk with Christ. We must spend time being filled up with the Spirit of God in worship, prayer, hearing the Word, in Communion and in fellowship with others so that we might reach out in love.

Each of us has an integral and irreplaceable part to play in this holy rhythm – this sacred dance. Are we open to what God is calling us to do or where God is calling us to be? Are we open to serving those God is calling us to serve? Do we take the time to listen to the still voice of God instead of plowing forward with our own agendas? Are we, like Mary, able to trust God and the work God wants to do in our lives? And, like Mary, can we sing out in joy and thanksgiving about the great things God has done for us and all people?

Mary’s song, the Magnificat, not only reminds us of the miraculous acts of God, but it serves as a witness to us that we are also called to be “God-bearers,” to use the gifts we have been given to share the love and forgiveness of God with the world. A young girl once listened to and trusted in the call of God to give birth to a child – a child who would grow up and change the world forever. If you listen closely, what is God calling you to do? Amen.

© 2010. Annabelle Peake. All rights reserved.

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