Tag Archive: Holy Week


“Hosanna in the highest!” Even thought I’m not a Jesus Christ Superstar fan, I can’t help hearing this song in my head whenever the word “hosanna” comes up:

What is always fascinating to me about this song, and this Sunday (Sunday of the Passion/Palm Sunday), is that we quickly go from praising Christ to reading the passion story, putting ourselves in the place of the crowd. Let me explain that a bit. The song is happy and upbeat, but it has almost a menacing undertone which grows in intensity over the course of the song. Likewise, we begin waving palm branches and shouting “hosanna” to welcome Jesus to Jerusalem, but how quickly our cries turn during the liturgy to shouts of “crucify him!” I find this puzzling and powerful, sobering and also dramatic.

We hear the story of Jesus’ trial and crucifixion and I’m always amazed at how quickly the tide turns – from joy and acclamation to angry mobs and the death of the one we call Savior. Likewise, Psalm 130 (and so many of the psalms) oscillate between lament and hope, sorrow and joy:

1 Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord.
2 Lord, hear my voice!
Let your ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplications!
3 If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities,
Lord, who could stand?
4 But there is forgiveness with you,
so that you may be revered.
5 I wait for the Lord, my soul waits,
and in his word I hope;
6 my soul waits for the Lord
more than those who watch for the morning,
more than those who watch for the morning.
7 O Israel, hope in the Lord!
For with the Lord there is steadfast love,
and with him is great power to redeem.
8 It is he who will redeem Israel
from all its iniquities.

This psalm is both a plea for help and forgiveness as well as a song of praise for and trust in what God can do. It flows between knowing what God could do (mark iniquities) to declaring what God does do (forgive). God’s forgiveness, mercy and redeeming love take over rather than judgment. Rather than getting what we deserve for the sins we’ve committed, no matter how large or small, we receive the gift of grace. It’s because of this that we can “revere” God. Some translations even have “fear” instead of “revere,” indicating a deep awe for God and who God is.

I’m still processing this psalm as well as Palm Sunday, but I’m happy that they’re causing me to think and that they can’t be figured out in a few days! We’re now entering Holy Week and in order to be ready for Easter, I am going to try memorizing Psalm 145, which is rather long. We’ll see how I do!

Father, grant us insight and clarity this Holy Week as we meditate on the life, death and resurrection of your precious son, Jesus. We give you thanks for his coming into the world and his dying and rising for our sake. May we take the time to listen to you and what you would teach us during this week. Draw us closer to you and fill us with your Holy Spirit that we might be renewed and strengthened for service to you and to our neighbors. In the name of Christ Jesus, AMEN.

© 2011. Annabelle Peake. All rights reserved.

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A few days ago, I heard the song “Make You Feel My Love” by Adele. I love its simplicity and the gorgeous harmonies that develop as the song progresses. It’s a beautiful love song for sure, but as I listened to it on YouTube and looked at the lyrics (posted below), I thought that maybe it spoke to a deeper truth.

“When the rain is blowing in your face,
and the whole world is on your case,
I could offer you a warm embrace
to make you feel my love.

When the evening shadows and the stars appear,
and there is no one there to dry your tears,
I could hold you for a million years
to make you feel my love.

I know you haven’t made your mind up yet,
but I would never do you wrong.
I’ve known it from the moment that we met,
no doubt in my mind where you belong.

I’d go hungry; I’d go black and blue,
I’d go crawling down the avenue.
No, there’s nothing that I wouldn’t do
to make you feel my love.

The storms are raging on the rolling sea
and on the highway of regret.
Though winds of change are throwing wild and free,
you ain’t seen nothing like me yet.

I could make you happy, make your dreams come true.
Nothing that I wouldn’t do.
Go to the ends of the Earth for you,
to make you feel my love”

As I listened, I found myself thinking, “does God sing like this to us?” I would answer “yes.” God is there for us when “the whole world is on your (our) case” or “there is no one there to dry your (our) tears,” extending loving arms to us as a parent would to comfort a child. God patiently waits for us to turn to God even though we may not know what exactly to think about God or faith.

In the song, Adele sings, “no, there’s nothing that I wouldn’t do to make you feel my love.” Celebrating Holy Week last week, I heard again the stories of God’s amazing acts in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and of the sufferings of Jesus Christ, and, as I listened, I heard echoes of that line from Adele’s song. I think the authors of the Bible, in both the Old and New Testaments, are trying desperately to show us through story, song and letters how God has been trying to reach us throughout history.

Look how far God has gone to make us feel God’s incredible love for us – God brought up God’s beloved people Israel from Egypt, God delivered Israel from exile, and God has consistently taken sides with the poor, the oppressed, the marginalized and those crying out for mercy and justice. Taking this to the ultimate step, God took on human flesh and went to the cross for our sake. When the Crucifixion occurred 2,000 years ago, the world hadn’t seen anything like that and we still haven’t seen such an act since. Yes, there were many crucifixions, but never one in which an innocent man died in order to redeem the world. I would consider that going to the “ends of the earth,” wouldn’t you?

I enjoy this song as one sung about human love for sure, but I think it’s given me another chance to think about God’s amazing love for all of humanity. God is there, waiting to comfort us and bring us through the storms, winds, changes and regrets Adele sings about, even if we haven’t quite decided what to make of God. Thankfully though, God won’t stop trying to reach us – won’t ever stop trying to make us feel God’s love.

Happy Easter!

© 2010. Annabelle Peake. All rights reserved.

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