Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about stories.  I have always loved stories, whether diving into one in a good book and feeling a sense of melancholy when it comes to an end, being captivated by movies, or listening to my grandparents tell me about their childhoods.  Stories have a way of drawing us in and helping us to see ourselves through other means.

Now, one of the things I love most about being a vicar (an intern in the ELCA, learning how to be a pastor) is having the incredible opportunity to listen to people’s stories.  I hear their stories about their past, as well as about what is going on in their lives now.  I also have the amazing chance to hear about how God’s story is a part of their lives and about how they are a part of God’s story in the world.  I have been blessed to be able to recall and share my own story with others, and to be greatly enriched by their stories.

Today, on David Lose’s website, In the Meantime, I ran across a video of Ken Burn’s speaking about story – I commend both Lose’s website as well as this video to you.  Apparently, I’m not the only one who has been thinking about stories lately!

Thinking about all of this, I’d like to put some questions to you:

  • What’s your story?  People may object, saying that they’re not very interesting people or that they’re just “normal” or “average,” but I disagree – I’ve found that everyone has a story and that each is unique and has something to teach us.
  • Whose stories have you learned from in the past?  Whose stories have shaped the way you think about the world?  About life?  God? Relationships? About who you are?
  • Who can you invite to tell their story this week?  People don’t often have someone who is willing to listen to their story and so it goes untold or neglected.  Let’s invite people to share by be willing to listen and to speak about our own stories.

How could paying attention to stories change the way we look at ourselves and one another?  I’m not sure, but I’m interested in finding out!  If you take on these questions, please post your comments about how the experiment went.  And for more stories, check out NPR’s StoryCorps.  Enjoy 🙂

© 2012. Annabelle Peake Markey. All rights reserved.

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